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Besides posting book reviews, once in a while I will be posting articles on the subject of pulps. I hope we can generate more interest for the Blog. If you would like to share an article on the pulps, you can send me a message in the Comments of a post.

Friday, September 13, 2013

Radio Archives


 
 
September 13, 2013
 
It's the 80th Anniversary of G-8, The Spider and Dime Mystery magazines!
Over the next five newsletters, Radio Archives will roll out an uninterrupted steam of exciting products spotlighting the works of pulp superstars Robert J. Hogan, R. T. M. Scott and Norvell W. Page. Here’s Will Murray to tell you more:
“In the Autumn of 1933, Popular Publications took the pulp universe by storm when they released in rapid succession, G-8 and His Battle Aces, The Spider, and the first of the weird menace pulps, Dime Mystery magazine. For the 80th anniversary of these historic debuts, we're releasing some of the earliest and most exciting issues of these fabulous titles. You'll thrill to the continued exploits of G-8, as well as the electrifying debuts of The Spider and Dime Mystery magazine. These thrilling titles come to life in affordable audiobooks, along with companion eBooks. You'll enjoy them all. I guarantee it.”
 

“I’m The Comic Weekly Man, the jolly Comic Weekly Man and I’m here to read the funnies to you happy boys and honeys.”

This memorable theme song welcomed its audience to one of the most unique programs of the era of Classic Radio. The concept was simple. The Comic Weekly Man sang his song, then picked up the newspaper, flipped right to the comic strips, and read them aloud to millions of listeners, replete with different voices, music, and sound effects.
 
Airing on Mutual beginning in 1947, The Comic Weekly Man combined two pastimes important to American families, Radio and Comic strips. Reading from Puck: The Comic Weekly found in the papers owned by William Randolph Hearst, The Comic Weekly Manbrought comic strip favorites – from Flash Gordon to Beetle Bailey, from Prince Valiant to Snuffy Smith - to life in a way most strips had never been heard.
 
One amazing aspect of this program is just how many voices were heard each week. The Comic Weekly Man, voiced by veteran radio actor Lon Clark, voiced all the male parts while Little Miss Honey, a young girl, assisted with the female roles. A whole cast of comic strip heroes and villains performed by two actors.
 
Fully restored, the sparkling audio quality of this collection features 20 episodes of comic strips turned radio adventures. Listen as the comic strips of your childhood joke, fight, and tickle their way to your ears with the The Comic Weekly Man, Volume 2. 10 hours $29.98 Audio CDs / $14.99 Download.

Listen to Lon Clark discussing The Comic Weekly Man from a 1994 FOTR panel discussion.
 
New Radio Digital Downloads now Available
 
For fourteen years, Radio Archives has been known for the amazing audio quality of our classic radio audio CD collections and it's no wonder. We insist upon finding the absolute best quality masters, then carefully restoring them so that they retain all of the audio luster of the original recordings with none of the crackle, pops, hiss, or muffling so often heard in radio shows from other sources.
 
So, when we decided to start offering digital downloads of these same collections, two years ago, we knew that you'd accept nothing but the absolute best quality.
 
If you enjoy audio entertainment on your computer, your cell phone, or a portable device, you'll be glad to hear that we've just added another sizable batch of digital downloads. Included are such long-time customer favorites as Suspense, The Best of the Big Bands, Boston Blackie, Archive Masters, Mystery is My Hobby, Night Watch, and Crime Club!
 
Digital downloads from RadioArchives.com give you the best of everything. Top quality shows in sparkling audio fidelity, available to you for instant delivery around the clock and, with digital downloads, you'll pay no postage or delivery charges! Whether you live in Beijing, Basingstoke, or Bakersfield, just place your order and, within minutes, you'll be enjoying some great entertainment.
 
We have 240 radio collections and we are very pleased to announce that the final 4 radio collections are available for the first time today as digital downloads. Great shows, great sound, and great prices, too!
 
 
Special 50% discount Offer
Enemy to those who make him an enemy, friend to those who have no friend!
 
That's Boston Blackie, safecracker turned crime fighter and a long-running favorite with fans of straight-ahead detective fiction in a wide range of media. Beginning inauspiciously in a 1919 short story by author Jack Boyle, Blackie progressed from the printed page into silent films, then into talkies, and finally, in the 1940s, into radio.
 
The actor who would ultimately be radio's Blackie for the greatest length of time seemed, initially, to be a rather odd choice for the part: Broadway leading man and sometime soap opera actor Richard Kollmar, best known to radio fans along the Eastern seaboard as the urbane Dick of WOR's "Breakfast with Dorothy and Dick," a morning show which also featured his wife, newspaper columnist Dorothy Kilgallen. In 1938, In 1944, he was contracted to star in a series of 220 syndicated episodes of "Boston Blackie," produced at station WOR in New York City and distributed by the Frederic W. Ziv Company of Cincinnati.
 
There's no tormented noir drama here, no deep layers of introspection, just good old-fashioned crime solving fun. And you can enjoy the clean, crisp sound of these newly restored episodes in this second collection from Radio Archives - ten more hours of great sounding light-hearted detective action and adventure. Included are the first two shows from the 1944 summer series starring Chester Morris, as broadcast over NBC, and the remaining shows feature Dick Kollmar in the leading role. 10 hours. Regular Price $29.98 - Specially priced until September 26 for $14.99 Audio CDs / $7.49 Download.
 
 
80th Anniversary of G-8 and His Battle Aces
Will Murray's Pulp Classics #32
by Robert J. Hogan
Read by Nick Santa Maria. Liner Notes by Will Murray
 
 
Out of war-torn skies soars…G-8 and His Battles Aces! The greatest combat pilot of the War to End All Wars, G-8’s true name was stricken from all official records. Flying a supercharged warplane, backed by his wild wingmen, Bull Martin and Nippy Weston, G-8 fought the most horrific foes the Kaiser could throw at him. The creation of writer Robert J. Hogan, G-8 and His Battles Aces appeared in the magazine of that same name for over a decade.
 
Eighty years ago in the summer of 1933, Popular Publications President Harry Steeger and his executive editor, Rogers Terrill, decided to enter the new field of pulp magazines built around a single hero. They enlisted popular aviation fictioneer Robert J. Hogan to help conceive G-8 and his Battle Aces, which debuted late in August.
 
Steeger recalled, “I can remember that Bob Hogan and I picked “G-8” because G-8 was the hero of his first novel and I added “Battle Aces” so that people would know what type of magazine it was and also because Battle Aces had been a very successful book.”
 
G-8 was born in the front seat of a car crawling through the Holland Tunnel. His father was Robert Jasper Hogan, who had made quite a name for himself as a prolific pulp writer specializing in aviation fiction during the glamorous era of aircraft now styled Between the Wars. Among practitioners of that now-lost art, this school of writing was styled Yammering Guns, after the sound of contending synchronized cockpit-mounted machine guns in furious action.
 
Steeger and Hogan hashed out an idea. It was part Eddie Rickenbacker and part What Price Glory?—which was a popular Maxwell Anderson stage play turned into a motion picture.Price stressed the horrors of war as counterpoint to the sentimental comradeship of the Allies in the trenches. Only in this case, by horror, Popular Publications meant something far more horrific than mustard-gas trench warfare atrocities.
 
For, envisioning the expected strain on the writer’s imagination a monthly novel would enact, Steeger and Hogan agreed that the new series would soon grow stale of they didn’t spice it up with elements of the fantastic. This recipe ranged from merely super-scientific death rays to unabashedly supernatural manifestations. Nothing was taboo in G-8. Hogan was a pioneer of over-the-top plotting generations before the term was invented.
 
Driving home to New Jersey from Manhattan, Hogan passed through the Holland Tunnel. While in traffic, he worked out the details of G-8’s first wild adventure. He named his hero after a Colorado ranch where Hogan worked one summer. G-8 never had another name. His wingmen, Bull Martin and Nippy Weston, were modeled on a pair of real-life flyboys named Bull Nevin and Nippy Westover.
 
The premier G-8 tale, which appeared in the October, 1933 issue of G-8 and His Battle Aces, exemplified the outrageous approach Steeger and Hogan envisioned for the series. Hogan called it The Bat Staffel. Therein he introduced a twisted German genius who would bedevil his new hero the length and breadth of the series—some eleven tortured years. This first time out, the Kaiser’s maddest mad scientist, Herr Doktor Kreuger, unleashed monster bats as big as bi-planes on Allied Sopwith Camels and Spads. It made for fearsome reading.
 
Before it was all over, G-8 battled weird menaces ranging from Martians to Zombies, with assorted undead minions of the Kaiser sandwiched in between. If Hogan couldn’t concoct a fresh beast-man, why, a clutch of cave men or freshly-defrosted Viking berserkers would keep readers riveted. Recurring foes came and went. G-8 finally vanquished Herr Doktor Krueger late in the series. Or did he? Maybe they renewed their feud for World War II. If so, Hogan failed to record those encounters. No doubt they would have captivated ever-loyal fans of the one and only Flying Spy.
 
For our second G-8 release, and to celebrate the 80th anniversary of the magazine’s founding, we’ve selected one of the wildest and weirdest novels in the series’ long run. The Death Monsters is taken from the pages of the March, 1935 issue of G-8 and his Battle Aces. In this nightmare story, Herr Doktor Kreuger, frustrated at being thwarted by the Master Spy time and again, deploys his most diabolical creations yet––the Ulp. What are they? Let’s just say that Kreuger may have gotten his inspiration from reading the works of H. P. Lovecraft....
 
This stupendous audiobook is brought to life by Nick Santa Maria, with Roy Worley and Milton Bagby reading the exciting short stories, “Too Old to Fight!” and “The Wolf Ace,” also by Robert J. Hogan. Prepare to follow a sky-trail of terror with G-8 and his unflappable wingmen... 6 hours $23.98 Audio CDs / $11.99 Download.
 
 
 
RadioArchives.com and Will Murray are giving away the downloadable version of the newly released Strange Detective Mysteries audiobook for FREE.
 
If you prefer the Audio CDs to play in your car or home CD player, the coupon code will subtract the $11.99 price of the download version from the Audio CDs. That makes the Audio CDs half price.
 
Add Strange Detective Mysteries to the shopping cart and use the Coupon Code AUDIOBOOK.
 
“Strange Detective Mysteries #1 is one of my favorite pulps and I am excited to produce it as an audiobook with my good friends at Radio Archives. It leads off with Norvell W. Page’s bizarre novelette, “When the Death-Bat Flies,” and includes thrilling stories by Norbert Davis, Paul Ernst, Arthur Leo Zagat, Wayne Rogers and others. Popular Publications went all-out to make this 1937 debut issue a winner. And they succeeded!”
 
Happy listening,
Will Murray
 
 
80th Anniversary of The Spider, G-8 and His Battle Aces, and Dime Mystery Magazine
 
New Will Murray's Pulp Classics eBooks
 
The best of timeless Pulp now available as cutting edge eBooks! Will Murray's Pulp Classics brings the greatest heroes, awesome action, and two fisted thrills to your eReader! Presenting Pulp Icons such as the Spider and G-8 and His Battle Aces as well as wonderfully obscure characters like the Octopus and Captain Satan. Will Murray's Pulp Classics brings you the best of yesterday's Pulp today!
 
How could even the inimitable Richard Wentworth, with all the brilliant devices of the Spider at his command, hope to vanquish the Brand?... For the Brand seems invulnerable behind the protection of a new and hideous weapon and Dick's valiant efforts are hampered by a super-detective, whose only job is to destroy the Spider! Total Pulp Experience. These exciting pulp adventures have been beautifully reformatted for easy reading as an eBook and features every story, every editorial, and every column of the original pulp magazine. $2.99.
 
Only a fiendishly brilliant scientist like Herr Doktor Krueger could create these monsters. Only men who laughed at death could dare defy their poison coils. The things marched along the Front, nightmare creatures whose tentacles crushed any planes that came within their reach. What were they? How could G-8 and his sky buddies fight them — destroy them before they threatened the entire world with destruction? G-8 and his Battle Aces rode the nostalgia boom ten years after World War I ended. These high-flying exploits were tall tales of a World War that might have been, featuring monster bats, German zombies, wolf-men, harpies, Martians, and even tentacled floating monsters. Most of these monstrosities were the work of Germany’s seemingly endless supply of mad scientists, chief of whom was G-8’s recurring Nemesis, Herr Doktor Krueger. G-8 battled Germany’s Halloween shock troops for over a decade, not ceasing until the magazine folded in the middle of World War II. G-8 and his Battle Aces return in vintage pulp tales, reissued for today’s readers in electronic format. $2.99.
 
In 1934 a new type of magazine was born. Known by various names — the shudder pulps, mystery-terror magazines, horror-terror magazines — weird menace is the sub-genre term that has survived today. Dime Mystery Magazine was one of the most popular. It came from Popular Publications, whose publisher Harry Steeger was inspired by the Grand Guignol theater of Paris. This breed of pulp story survived less than ten years, but in that time, they became infamous, even to this day. This ebook contains a collection of stories from the pages of Dime Mystery Magazine, all written by G T Fleming-Roberts and H M Appel, reissued for today’s readers in electronic format. $2.99, Save $1.00. $2.99.
 
99 cent eBook Singles
Each 99 cent eBook Single contains a single short story, one of the many amazing tales selected from the pages of Terror Tales and Rangeland Romances. These short stories are not included in any of our other eBooks.
 
Marie Delabart’s beauty was a thing not of this earth. Yet Ray Graham fought hopelessly for her against forces no man has ever conquered! In 1934 a new type of magazine was born. Known by various names — the shudder pulps, mystery-terror magazines, horror-terror magazines — weird menace is the sub-genre term that has survived today. Dime Mystery Magazine was one of the most popular. It came from Popular Publications, whose publisher Harry Steeger was inspired by the Grand Guignol theater of Paris. This breed of pulp story survived less than ten years, but in that time, they became infamous, even to this day. This ebook contains a classic story the pages of Dime Mystery Magazine, reissued for today’s readers in electronic format$0.99.
 
It was a soul that had no body; a voice that had no sound, that cried its eternal agony in the little room where so recently Death had come for the old man and the young lovers... In 1934 a new type of magazine was born. Known by various names — the shudder pulps, mystery-terror magazines, horror-terror magazines — weird menace is the sub-genre term that has survived today. Dime Mystery Magazine was one of the most popular. It came from Popular Publications, whose publisher Harry Steeger was inspired by the Grand Guignol theater of Paris. This breed of pulp story survived less than ten years, but in that time, they became infamous, even to this day. This ebook contains a classic story the pages of Dime Mystery Magazine, reissued for today’s readers in electronic format$0.99.
 
In modern New York, the Medieval Inquisition lived again! In 1934 a new type of magazine was born. Known by various names — the shudder pulps, mystery-terror magazines, horror-terror magazines — weird menace is the sub-genre term that has survived today. Dime Mystery Magazine was one of the most popular. It came from Popular Publications, whose publisher Harry Steeger was inspired by the Grand Guignol theater of Paris. This breed of pulp story survived less than ten years, but in that time, they became infamous, even to this day. This ebook contains a classic story the pages of Dime Mystery Magazine, reissued for today’s readers in electronic format$0.99.
 
It was the war that left my face scarred and fearful to look upon — but it was something else that turned me into a ravishing beast, filed with the lust for murder… In 1934 a new type of magazine was born. Known by various names — the shudder pulps, mystery-terror magazines, horror-terror magazines — weird menace is the sub-genre term that has survived today. Dime Mystery Magazine was one of the most popular. It came from Popular Publications, whose publisher Harry Steeger was inspired by the Grand Guignol theater of Paris. This breed of pulp story survived less than ten years, but in that time, they became infamous, even to this day. This ebook contains a classic story the pages of Dime Mystery Magazine, reissued for today’s readers in electronic format$0.99.
 
 
 
 
 
 
All eBooks produced by Radio Archives are available in ePub, Mobi, and PDF formats for the ultimate in compatibility. When you upgrade to a new eReader, you can transfer your eBook to your new device without the need to purchase anything new.
 
Find these legendary Pulp tales and more in Will Murray's Pulp Classics, now available at:
 
 
Search for RadioArchives.com in iTunes.
 
 
 
 
Receive an exciting original Spider adventure FREE! Part of the Will Murray Pulp Classics line, The Spider #11, Prince of the Red Looters first saw print in 1934 and features his momentous battle with The Fly and his armies of crazed criminal killers.
 
For those who have been unsure about digging into the wonderful world of pulps, this is a perfect chance to give one of these fantastic yarns a real test run. With a full introduction to the Spider written by famed pulp historian and author Will Murray, The Spider #11 was written by one of pulp's most respected authors, Norvell W. Page. Writing as Grant Stockbridge, Page's stories included some of the most bizarre and fun takes on heroes and crime fighting in the history of escapist fiction.
 
Even today Page's scenarios and his edge-of-the-seat writing style are still thrilling both new and old fans everywhere. For those who have never read one of these rollercoaster adventures, you are in for a thrill. If you already know how much fun a classic pulp is, make sure you get a copy of this classic.
 
See what the Total Pulp Experience is for yourself. These exciting pulp adventures have been beautifully reformatted for easy reading as an eBook and features every story, every editorial, and every column of the original pulp magazine.
 
Send an eMail to eBooks@RadioArchives.com and start reading your FREE copy of the Spider #11 within seconds! Experience The Best Pulps the Past has to offer in the most modern way possible!
 
 
 
80th Anniversary of The Spider
One of the top crime-fighters from the golden age of pulp fiction, The Spider returns in two thrill-packed adventures written by Norvell Page and Wayne Rogers under the pseudonym of Grant Stockbridge. First, in"The Devil's Candlesticks" (1938), a mystic murder spell has fallen over Manhattan, transforming America's moneyed aristocracy into ruthless fiends and criminals. New York's First Families, no longer the sturdy pillars of society, have been launched upon a career of slayings and thievery that exceeds that of the Underworld. Against this high-hatted holocaust, the law is powerless to act. Only Richard Wentworth, as the Spider, can fight for his betrayed civilization, battling a Hindu horror league that has turned America's most wealthy citizens into lawless butchers! Then, in "Revolt of the Underworld" (1942), America's most ruthless criminals have declared war on the Spider. Organized by the Fox, this tireless and devious band have succeeded in framing Richard Wentworth for the apparent murder of Nita Van Sloan while also making the government suspect him of being an enemy agent. With so many against him, can the Spider successfully clear his name while also searching for the whereabouts of his beloved fiancée? These two exciting pulp adventures have been beautifully reformatted for easy reading and feature both of the original full color covers as well as interior illustrations that accompany each story. On sale for $12.95, save $2.00
 
 
The Knight of Darkness battles foreign threats to America in two classic pulp thrillers by Walter B. Gibson writing as "Maxwell Grant." First, with his alter ego compromised, The Shadow rises from the deep Pacific to confront Japanese agents and retrieve the U.S. Navy's prototype Z-boat, a submersible "Death Ship" that could tip the balance in the future war. Then, at the height of World War II, The Shadow and distaff aide Myra Reldon combat the treacherous plots of "The Black Dragon" and his sinister secret society. BONUS: "The Man with The Shadow's Face!" This instant collector's item reprints Graves Gladney's and Modest Stein's first Shadow covers in color plus the original interior illustrations by Edd Cartier and Paul Orban, with commentary by Will Murray. $14.95.
 
 
The Pulp Era's greatest superman returns in two action-packed pulp novels by Harold Davis and Lester Dent writing as "Kenneth Robeson." First, a series of corpses bearing the bloody sign of "The Crimson Serpent" sets Doc Savage on a trail to an ancient castle, modern-day conquistadors and the Fountain of Youth! Then, the Man of Bronze and his Iron Men journey to South America to investigate the bizarre mystery of "The Exploding Lake" vaporized in a nuclear inferno. This double-novel collector's special leads off with a thrill-packed color cover by Emery Clarke, and features Paul Orban's original interior illustrations, historical commentary by Will Murray and a biographical profile of Golden Age Doc Savage Comics artist Elmer Stoner. $14.95.
 
80th Anniversary of The Spider
This is an authentic replica of an original pulp magazine published by Girasol Collectables. This edition is designed to give the reader an authentic taste of what a typical pulp magazine was like when it was first issued - but without the frailty or expense of trying to find a decades-old collectable to enjoy. The outer covers, the interior pages, and the advertisements are reprinted just as they appeared in the original magazine, left intact to give the reader the true feel of the original as well as an appreciation for the way in which these publications were first offered to their avid readers. To further enhance the “pulp experience”, this edition is printed on off-white bond paper intended to simulate the original look while, at the same time, assuring that this edition will last far longer than the original upon which it is based. The overall construction and appearance of this reprint is designed to be as faithful to the original magazine as is reasonably possible, given the unavoidable changes in production methods and materials. $35.00.
 
by Will Murray
 
The Writers of the Purple Wage have long since taken the last trail into dusty memory. But, now, they live again––to retell tall tales of those distant days when they helped forge the fabled West of American Imagination.
 
They’re all here!
*The Popular hacks!
*The Spicy bestsellers!
*The Thrilling myths!
 
Those amazing million-words-a-year men!
True Westerners born on the Range!
Broadway cowboys never West of Hoboken!
 
Join Max Brand, Luke Short, Johnston McCulley, Ernest Haycox, Walt Coburn, Frank Gruber, Ryerson Johnson, & a hard-working, fast-drawing posse of freelance fictioneers!
 
And those two-fisted foremen of New York’s fiction factories–magazine editors Frank Blackwell, Rogers Terrill, Leo Margulies, Robert Lowndes & Fanny Ellsworth!
 
Together, in their own words, these veteran pulpsters & others offer startling inside stories of how they created the mythology of the Golden West!
 
*Blazing action! Savage characterization! Real emotion!
 
Ride with the Old West’s top gunhands, greatest pulpsmiths & legendary brands. From Buffalo Bill, Deadwood Dick & Hopalong Cassidy to Gunsmoke & Louis L’Amour, this is their saga.
 
Armed with forgotten interviews, controversial essays & candid letters first not seen in generations, acclaimed pulp historian Will Murray, author of The Wild Adventures of Doc Savage, reveals the epic life & frequent deaths of the Pulp West! 469 pages, approx. 6"x9" $29.98
 
By John Olsen
 
Malmordo was originally published in the July 1946 issue of "The Shadow Magazine." A sinister figure that haunts the sewers of New York, that is Malmordo. A crime figure of international repute has brought his hoards of ratlike minions to America to begin a new wave of crime. Thus, The Shadow will pursue the world's most desperate criminal.This story stands out among the other 1946 pulp mysteries of The Shadow. This and an earlier story, "Crime Out of Mind," stand as the top two Shadow stories of the year. Of course, 1946 wasn't known as a strong year for Shadow tales, so perhaps bestowing that title upon this story isn't all that much of an honor. Of the weaker tales for that year, there were "The Banshee Murders" in which no murders took place, "Crime Over Casco" in which The Shadow casually reveals his most closely guarded secret to near-strangers, and "The Curse of Thoth" which showed definite traces of heavy-handed editing.
Things really went downhill in August of 1946, when long-time author Walter Gibson left the magazine series and Bruce Elliott took over the writing tasks for the next two years. The following month after "Malmordo" brought readers "The Blackest Mail," a Shadow story which Bruce Elliott butchered so badly that I can still barely consider reading it again. Yes, 1946 was not a good year for The Shadow. But "Malmordo" made things a bit brighter for the year as a whole.The story opens on a fog-covered pier along the North River. A banana boat, the Steamship Santander, lies at anchor. A gypsy named Panjo is seeking birds that have been smuggled in on the Santander. Parrots, macaws and similar birds are regularly being smuggled from South America into New York Harbor. But this time, there are no birds. The birds are all dead; killed by huge rats. Why does Panjo seek exotic birds? That's just one of the many things that is revealed later in the story.
Inspector Joe Cardona is also down at the pier; he patrols the docks looking for stowaways that have been slipping into port. Little does he realize that this simple old hulk carries not only stowaways who are sneaking into the country from Europe, via South America, but it also contains other bizarre passengers, as well. There are the huge rats that are bigger than the cats...
 
Double Novel reprint $12.95
 
Comments From Our Customers!
 
Dorothea writes:
I love old radio broadcasts! The Adventures of Marco Polo, was originally written in 1300 about the tales of adventure into the exotic lands of Asia, Persia, China, and Indonesia, by Marco Polo. At the time, little was known about these places so reading about them fascinated many people. The stories of Marco Polo's adventures were made into a movie starring Gary Cooper in 1938 and the radio broadcast soon followed two years later. The original broadcast was a 52-episode twice a week series created by George Edwards.
 
Volume one, which starts out with Niccolo Polo and his brother Maffeo (Marco Polo's father and uncle) who want Marco Polo to grow up and take on some more of the responsibility for the family business. Marco is a fun-loving party goer and wants to marry his current love. His father and uncle kidnap him and take him on their ship, forcing him to go on an adventure they hope will bring on a more worldly and mature Marco. It was fun listening to this story. I think anyone who enjoys old radio show broadcasts would love The Adventures of Marco Polo. Although this broadcast was originally done in 1940, it is crystal clear and has no popping or hissing like older broadcasts tend to do.
 
If you'd like to share a comment with us or if you have a question or a suggestion send an email to Service@RadioArchives.com. We'd love to hear from you!

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